Recent Stories

Photo of midsection of a person while they inject insulin

Fewer diabetes patients are picking up their insulin prescriptions

November 18, 2021, Ismaeel Yunusa

Changes in insulin prescription rates because of the pandemic underscore the challenges that people with diabetes face in accessing care, Ismaeel Yunusa assistant professor of clinical pharmacy and outcomes sciences, writes for The Conversation. The effects of the pandemic on diabetes go beyond insulin prescriptions. As COVID-19 overwhelmed health care systems, people with chronic conditions like diabetes have experienced significant disruptions in routine and emergency medical care.

Family nurse practitioner Tamieka Alston-Gibson

UofSC graduates help fill the gaps in rural health care

November 16, 2021, Megan Sexton

As the country marks Rural Health Day this week, the University of South Carolina works — through its School of Medicine, College of Nursing, Arnold School of Public Health and other areas — to understand and improve the delivery of health care in rural and underserved communities.

Etienne Toussaint

New faculty spotlight: Etienne Toussaint

November 15, 2021, Page Ivey

New law professor Etienne Toussaint came to the legal profession after starting out as an engineer, building bridges. After working internationally with Engineers Without Borders, he saw how a legal career would let him help lift those living in extreme poverty in the U.S. and around the world.

Ebony Toussaint

New faculty spotlight: Ebony Toussaint

November 02, 2021, Page Ivey

University of South Carolina alumna Ebony Toussaint joined the university as a faculty member this fall, working with the Rural and Minority Health Research Center in the Arnold School of Public Health. One of her first research projects will be a study of how evictions impact mental health, on which she will work with her husband, Etienne Toussaint, who is a new law professor.

Man in red cap wearing gloves gives another man a packet of face masks

Having COVID-19 may make you more charitable

October 22, 2021, Nancy Buchan and Orgul Ozturk

A 2020 online study found that people in the United States who were more directly affected by the COVID-19 pandemic were 9 percent more likely to donate to charity than others, and they donated 9.2% more money. The study replicated in Italy found similar results, Moore School professors Nancy Buchan and Orgul Ozturk write in The Conversation with co-author Gianluca Grimalda, Kiel Institute for the World Economy.

Thomas Crocker smiling

Constitutional law scholar discusses his new book on presidential powers

October 18, 2021, Craig Brandhorst

Law professor Thomas Crocker specializes in constitutional law, criminal procedure, free speech and democracy, national security and the Constitution. His new book, "Overcoming Necessity: Emergency, Constraint, and the Meanings of American Constitutionalism" (Yale University Press) is an analysis of how the concept of necessity, in conflict with constitutional commitments, creates dynamic challenges to constitutional governance, especially during times of emergency.

A North Atlantic right whale breaches the surface of the water.

UofSC professor: Human-driven climate change is devastating ocean ecosystems

September 28, 2021, Rose Cisneros and Bryan Gentry

Warming oceans are driving some marine populations out of their habitats and into peril, according to new research by University of South Carolina professor Erin Meyer-Gutbrod. The temperature change is affecting creatures large and small, from the critically endangered North Atlantic right whale to more common fish whose habitats are losing oxygen.

Artist's rendition of ancient buildings made of mudbricks with explosion in sky

A giant space rock demolished an ancient Middle Eastern city and everyone in it

September 21, 2021, Christopher Moore

About 3,600 years ago, a giant space rock exploded in a massive fireball in the atmosphere above an ancient Middle Eastern city. The explosion destroyed the city, killing its 8,000 inhabitants and setting off a massive shockwave that ripped through the city and surrounding areas. University of South Carolina archaeologist Christopher Moore and his colleagues explain for The Conversation how they know how this actually happened near the Dead Sea in Jordan thousands of years ago.

Nate Johnson at Rose Hill Plantation

Putting history to work in the world

September 16, 2021, Page Ivey

UofSC's public history graduates apply their knowledge and love of history to encourage civic engagement by making the past more understandable and accessible to the general public. They also are helping to refine our understanding of our past through new scholarship to tell a more inclusive history.

Jamy Claire Archer stands in the COMD lab

Hindsight 2020: The therapist

September 01, 2021, Craig Brandhorst

Singers, teachers and public speakers can feel the effects of the pandemic, whether or not they contract the virus. Enter clinical professor of communication sciences and disorders and voice therapist Jamy Claire Archer, one of 10 Gamecocks Carolinian magazine spoke to about how the pandemic has changed the way we work.

Rohit Talwani at his desk

Gamecock alumnus, physician reflects on how COVID-19 changed how he practices medicine

August 03, 2021, Chris Horn

COVID has offered the health care sector some valuable lessons, says University of South Carolina School of Medicine alumnus Rohit Talwani. A Baltimore-based physician and University of Maryland School of Medicine associate professor of infectious diseases, Dr. Talwani is one of 10 Gamecocks Carolinian magazine spoke to about how the pandemic has changed the way we work.

Hudsonian Godwit

Biologist searches for environmental tipping points in marathon migratory species

July 26, 2021, Chris Horn

As a population biologist at the University of South Carolina, Nate Senner studies migratory bird species whose feats of endurance make his own look almost puny by comparison. What interests him most is not just the extremes that different bird species can endure but the many environmental variables to which they must adapt — with the long-term survival of their species population hanging in the balance.

xiaoming li

Breakthrough Leader: Xiaoming Li

July 14, 2021, Chris Horn

If Xiaoming Li was a professional athlete instead of a public health professor, he would make the All-Star team every year. Since joining the university in 2015 as director of the South Carolina SmartState Center for Health Care Quality, Li has authored or co-authored 179 scholarly publications and instituted an interdisciplinary campuswide Junior Scholar program that has successfully trained 41 doctoral students from different disciplines.

UofSC faculty experts list on the Summer Olympics

June 25, 2021, Tenell Felder

Japan will host the Summer Olympic Games July 23 to Aug. 8. Though the Olympics will be taking place in 2021 due to the COVID-19 pandemic, they will continue to be officially branded as the 2020 Tokyo Olympics. To help journalists report on the Tokyo games, the University of South Carolina has compiled a list of faculty experts.

graphic depicting eyeball

SmartSight project unleashes power of AI to assist blind, visually impaired

June 18, 2021, Chris Horn

Pooyan Jamshidi, an assistant professor of computer science and engineering, is a principal investigator on a three-year $500,000 NSF collaborative grant to develop the intelligence and computing capabilities for a smart device dubbed SmartSight. The platform will enable on-device artificial intelligence to improve real-time perception for blind and visually-impaired users.

Yi Wang

Breakthrough Star: Yi Wang

June 15, 2021, Chris Horn

Simulation and computing is a mainstay in engineering design, a mathematical modeling process that allows engineers to predict the behavior of a machine or system in real-world conditions. But if the datasets are huge and complex, modeling can take days or even weeks to sort out. That’s why Yi Wang is using a method called reduced-order models to speed things up.

Film character Lady of Guadalupe in pink and lace dress and blue shawl over her head

'Lady of Guadalupe' avoids tough truths

June 14, 2021, Rebecca Janzen

The film “Lady of Guadalupe” available on many streaming services, mixes a fictional retelling of the 16th-century appearance of the Virgin Mary to a Mexican peasant named Juan Diego with the tale of a wholly fictional 21st-century reporter. Professor of Spanish and comparative literature Rebecca Janzen writes in The Conversation although the film portrays the story of the Virgin of Guadalupe for a broad audience, ultimately itsanitizes the real-life brutality of the Church toward Indigenous peoples in the 16th century.

Allie Trice will attend graduate school at Oxford thanks to the Barry Scholarship

English, history graduate is first UofSC recipient of Barry Scholarship to study at Oxford

June 14, 2021, Page Ivey

Allie Trice was an outstanding undergraduate student at the University of South Carolina, excelling in class and conducting publishable research. But a dedication to the pursuit of truth is even more important for the university’s first recipient of the Barry Scholarship, which opened the door to graduate school at the University of Oxford.

damaged beach house

Climate change, coastlands and the most vulnerable who live there

June 03, 2021, Chris Horn

A rising tide might lift all boats, but not everyone fares the same with rising seas. Monica Barra has documented that fact extensively in her studies of coastal land loss among communities of color in the bayous of Louisiana. With a focus on the ways that residents, scientific knowledge and the coastal landscape intersect, the assistant professor of race and environment is bringing a similar research perspective to the South Carolina coastline.

Ten soldiers pose beside a plane in a World War II archive photo.

Documenting UofSC alumni who made the ultimate sacrifice

May 27, 2021, Megan Sexton

James Hull works in the Office of Veterans and Military Services at the University of South Carolina, certifying veteran education benefits for students. He also has taken on a project that combines both his love of history and his military service: Documenting every UofSC student or alumni who died while serving in uniform over the past 120 years.

A woman and a man make the Wakanda gesture. Man holds a photo of actor Chadwick Boseman.

Colorectal cancer screening recommended at age 45 instead of 50 - it's no fun, but it's worth it

May 25, 2021, Franklin G. Berger

Colorectal cancer remains a major source of cancer incidence and mortality worldwide. The American Cancer Society recently estimated that in 2021, there will be 149,500 new cases of colorectal cancer and 52,980 deaths in the U.S. alone. In The Conversation, Franklin G. Berger, professor emeritus in biological sciences, writes about two significant developments that could save lives.

UofSC experts: 2021 hurricane season

May 20, 2021, Tenell Felder

The Atlantic hurricane season officially begins June 1. Top researchers at the University of South Carolina are available to discuss multiple aspects of the 2021 hurricane season, including forecasting, disaster planning and historical perspectives.

shelley Welton

Breakthrough Star: Shelley Welton

May 18, 2021, Page Ivey

Shelley Welton wanted no part of the law after watching her mother work tirelessly in children’s law and come up against structural issues that day-to-day lawyering couldn’t fix. But after getting a master’s degree in environmental policy work, she realized that she needed a better understanding of the law to make progress.

Jaeseung Kim in a suit and tie

COVID-19 Impact: Gender disparities in pandemic's effect

April 14, 2021, Page Ivey

Jaeseung Kim, assistant professor in the College of Social Work since 2018, studies work and caregiving challenges for low-income parents and how work-family policies, both private and public, can help address such challenges. We asked Kim about how the pandemic has affected men and women differently and how to help those suffering the effects.

woman with brown hair, white shirt and navy jacket with a man's hand on her shoulder

Women frequently experience sexual harassment at work, yet few claims ever reach a courtroom

April 14, 2021, Joseph A. Seiner

Sexual harassment at work is a very common occurrence for women, regardless of age or income level. Among women who have experienced unwanted sexual advances in the workplace, almost all reported that male harassers usually go unpunished. Law professor Joseph Seiner writes in The Conversation about the unfortunate reality that engaging in this conduct will result in no real consequences.

UofSC home to 60 ranked programs

UofSC med school leads nation for grads practicing in underserved areas

March 30, 2021, Megan Sexton

The School of Medicine Columbia is the top medical program in the country for graduates who are practicing in areas where there is a shortage of health care professionals, according to the latest U.S. News & World Report’s Best Graduate School rankings. The rankings also show that UofSC is now home to more than 60 nationally ranked programs.

Woman wearing a yellow scarf with blurred background

Education professor fights status quo to make schools more equitable

March 22, 2021, Carol J.G. Ward

For three and a half decades, University of South Carolina education professor Gloria Boutte has dedicated her work to creating school experiences that are more equitable for students of color. Her scholarship, teaching, leadership and service have been recognized with the 2021 Legacy Award from American Educational Research Association.

empty dining room with the alps in the background

COVID-19 impact: Changes in tourism

March 18, 2021, Craig Brandhorst

A year into the COVID-19 pandemic, we asked members of the university community to share their expertise about how the coronavirus has affected all facets of life and offer insights on ways to move forward. Simon Hudson, a professor of tourism in the College of Hospitality, Retail and Sport Management, speaks about COVID-19’s economic impact on the tourism industry.

students walk in building on campus

VIDEO: Team effort allowed students to return to campus in fall

March 18, 2021, Joshua Burrack

From the classroom to the research lab to the front lines of testing and tracing, the University of South Carolina community has taken extraordinary steps over the past year to safeguard its students, faculty and staff in the face of COVID-19. As we mark the one-year point of the pandemic, here’s the third in a three-part video series documenting the resilience, ingenuity and commitment that have guided us through this period.

researchers sample wastewater

COVID video series: Tracking wastewater

March 15, 2021, Joshua Burrack

From the classroom to the research lab to the front lines of testing and tracing, the University of South Carolina community has taken extraordinary steps over the past year to safeguard its students, faculty and staff in the face of COVID-19. As we mark the one-year point of the pandemic, here’s the second in a three-part video series documenting the resilience, ingenuity and commitment that have guided us through this period.

researchers work with test tubes

Resilience, ingenuity define UofSC's COVID response

March 11, 2021, Joshua Burrack

From the classroom to the research lab to the front lines of testing and tracing, the University of South Carolina community has taken extraordinary steps over the past year to safeguard its students, faculty and staff in the face of COVID-19. As we mark the one-year point of the pandemic, here’s the first in a three-part video series documenting the resilience, ingenuity and commitment that have guided us through this period.

Woman with gray hair, gray shirt and black mask standing at a table, displaying health items. Man and woman at table with back to viewer.

Researchers to help LGBTQIA+ populations navigate barriers to health information

March 09, 2021, Rebekah Buffington Friedman

Health disparities are common in LGBTQIA+ populations, in part because discrimination makes health information harder to come by. Over the next two years, a team of researchers from the University of South Carolina’s School of Information Science and Arnold School of Public Health will collaborate to recruit, learn from and develop specialized training for LGBTQIA+ community health workers.

An artist's concept of NASA's Mars 2020 rover

UofSC chemistry professor works with NASA in search of Martian life

February 12, 2021, Bryan Gentry

NASA’s Mars 2020 Perseverance Rover will land on the Red Planet on Feb. 18 and begin to study rocks and soils in search for evidence of past Martian life, which might be anything from biogenic organic compounds to ancient fossils. University of South Carolina professor Mike Angel is one of hundreds of scientists who will work together to direct the rover.

Technicians in a lab wearing gloves and safety goggles.

University of South Carolina to help lead Savannah River National Laboratory research innovation and workforce development

February 10, 2021

The University of South Carolina and the Battelle Savannah River Alliance are partnering to conduct critical research at one of the country’s premier national laboratories – the Savannah River National Laboratory. The partnership will contribute to workforce development and provide cutting-edge advancements in national security, energy and environmental research.

colorful graphic with the words fact and myth

UofSC faculty work to counteract the emotional power of misinformation

January 14, 2021, Carol JG Ward

Misinformation and disinformation circulated, consumed and believed by the public have a powerful influence on public opinion — often in a harmful way. Faculty members in the College of Information and Communications have conducted research to help improve media literacy, to teach people how to evaluate quality sources and to recognize clues for misinformation.

old gravestone for an enslaved person named Cicely

How history memorializes those who die from COVID-19 will reflect our values

December 03, 2020, Nicole S. Maskiell

As COVID-19 affects frontline workers and communities of color far more than other demographic groups, and protesters agitate for racial justice, American society is wrestling with its racial memory and judging which monuments and memorials deserve a place. In The Conversation, history professor Nicole S. Maskiell looks back at how a few marginalized and oppressed people who served on the front lines of prior epidemics have been treated and remembered.

Darla Moore School of Business economist Joey Von Nessen speaks at the University of South Carolina's 2018 Economic Outlook Conference

UofSC economic forecast for 2021: Palmetto State's economy largely rebounded, but significant gaps still remain

November 25, 2020

With a current unemployment rate of 4.2 percent — less than two percentage points away from its pre-pandemic low of 2.5 percent — South Carolina’s economy has largely recovered from the pandemic-induced recession of 2020, but UofSC economists caution that a COVID-19 vaccine will be required to return to full strength across all sectors in 2021.

Image of megaphone

COVID-19 and the retail sector

October 29, 2020, Chris Horn

Retail sales in the U.S. account for about one-half of personal consumer spending and nearly one-third 
of the country’s gross domestic product. But COVID-19 and its accompanying ripples — social distancing, 
lockdowns, layoffs and changes in consumer behavior — have unleashed turmoil in the retail sector. 
Jeff Campbell, an associate professor and chair of the retailing department in the College of Hospitality, 
Retail and Sport Management, offers his perspective on the current landscape in retailing and what 
lies ahead.

woman sneezing

UofSC scientists model how the COVID-19 virus might travel, settle in indoor environments

October 15, 2020, Chris Horn

In this age of COVID-19 concerns, what’s the safest indoor environment? One without humans, of course. In a practical world the answer lies partly in understanding how the virus moves and where it lands in indoor spaces because air ow and surfaces are important routes for transmission of COVID-19.

Several empty test tubes used for the Salivir Test lined up in a tray. They have the UofSC logo and barcodes on them.

Behind the scenes of SAFE Testing

October 09, 2020, Caleigh McDaniel

By now most students have heard about the university’s free Saliva Assay Free Expedited (SAFE) testing program, but we wondered what happens behind the scenes. We spoke with Carolyn Bannister, who serves as the manager for the College of Pharmacy’s Diagnostic Genomics Lab, to gather insights on what happens to your saliva sample between getting tested for COVID-19 on campus and receiving your results.

Actor Chadwick Boseman at the GQ Men of the Year party  in  2015.

Boseman's death underscores an alarming increase in from colorectal cancer among younger adults

September 02, 2020, Franklin G. Berger

The tragic death of Chadwick Boseman at age 43 following a four-year battle against colorectal cancer reminds us it is a difficult and emotional disease for people at any age. Franklin G. Berger, distinguished professor emeritus of biological sciences, writes for The Conversation that awareness of signs and symptoms, along with screening, will lead to the eventual eradication of the disease as a major form of cancer.

instructor and students perform an experiment at a summer camp

Camp will highlight Gullah/Geechee culture to spark students' interest in science

August 17, 2020, Carol J.G. Ward

A summer camp for fifth- and sixth grade-students in South Carolina’s Gullah/Geechee community will introduce Gullah/Geechee students to STEM content from their own community and provide opportunities to interact with professionals who look like them, working in the fields of science, technology, engineering or mathematics.

woman sits in front of computer screen

New library system makes it easier for users to find, access resources

August 15, 2020, Carol J.G. Ward

University of South Carolina Libraries partnered with more than 50 other academic libraries in South Carolina to launch a new shared library services platform this summer. The transition to the new system is an example of a trend in academic libraries nationwide to leverage technology, work more collaboratively and strategically, improve the user experience, and maximize the benefits of collections and limited resources.

women with banners stand by a monument in Washington D.C. in 1918 to advocate for women's suffrage

100 years of suffrage

August 06, 2020, Page Ivey

The month of August marks 100 years since the ratification of the 19th amendment giving women the right to vote in the United States. South Carolina women were a part of the fight for suffrage that started here in the years after the Civil War. Historians and librarians at the University of South Carolina have played a major role in documenting and preserving their stories.

man wearing a face covering walks in Paris with the Eiffel Tower in the background

Covid-19: Tourism update

July 16, 2020, Craig Brandhorst

As the coronavirus threatens health and upends daily life throughout the world, UofSC Today is turning to our faculty to help us make sense of it all. While no one can predict exactly what will happen in the coming months, our faculty can help us ask the right questions and put important context around emerging events. Simon Hudson, a professor of tourism in the College of Hospitality, Retail and Sport Management and author of the new book "COVID-19 and Travel: Impacts, Responses and Outcomes," keeps us up-to date on the pandemic’s travel sector impact.

Breakthrough Leader: Rob Ployhart

Breakthrough Leader: Rob Ployhart

July 13, 2020, Chris Horn

Ask any Fortune 500 company what it takes to get ahead in today’s marketplace, and you’ll probably hear something about workforce training and recruitment — the fundamentals of human resources. Rob Ployhart has made it his business to understand exactly how those factors translate into competitive advantage, and in the process he’s become one of the country’s most-cited scholars on the topic.