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Remembering the Days: Harry Walker, the underdog who won

October 03, 2021, Chris Horn

When students at the University of South Carolina elected a new Student Government president in 1971, the event made national news. That's because, just eight years after the university was desegregated, an African American student won the election, riding a wave of support from white and Black students who were tired of the "establishment" and "the system."

Elise Lewis, faculty principal of Capstone Scholars Program

Capstone Scholars faculty principal uses lessons from her own experience to guide living, learning community

September 01, 2021, Chris Horn

When she was a college freshman, Elise Lewis learned firsthand what happens when a student gets lost in the shuffle of a big university. Now, as faculty principal of the Capstone Scholars Program, one of the University of South Carolina’s best-known living and learning communities, Lewis is keen on getting students connected with one another and the university resources that can help them to thrive.

Lizzie Gandy, 1992 mechanical engineering alumna

From Hilton Head to Thunder Horse

August 31, 2021, Chris Horn

Lizzie Gandy one day will regale her grandchildren with stories about the years she strapped on a hard hat and rode a helicopter to her job on the biggest moored oil platform in the world, anchored deep in the Gulf of Mexico. In her latest position, Gandy doesn’t have to endure the same grind as before when she was supervising hundreds of oil platform workers in the open water. But she continues to find satisfaction in the work that a mechanical engineering degree from South Carolina in 1992 made possible.

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Remembering the Days: If it ain't swaying, we ain't playing

August 23, 2021, Chris Horn

When the Gamecocks take to the football field every fall, Williams-Brice Stadium roars with the full-throated spirit of 80,000-plus diehard fans, a battalion of marching band members, cheerleaders, baton twirlers and dancers and a hyperkinetic mascot, Cocky. It’s a far cry from the first football game played on the University of South Carolina campus in 1898 when a few hundred fans huddled on simple wooden bleachers beside a field situated where the Russell House Student Union now stands.

Jason Caskey, president/CEO of University Foundations

University Foundations president/CEO Jason Caskey talks about role in supporting UofSC

August 23, 2021, Chris Horn

Jason Caskey was named president and CEO of University Foundations in 2018 after a 28-year career in public accounting. The 1990 Darla Moore School of Business graduate oversees the university’s Educational Foundation and Development Foundation, which include the university’s investments from donors and real estate holdings, respectively.

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Remembering the Days: What's in a name?

August 09, 2021, Chris Horn

Since its inception more than 200 years ago, the University of South Carolina has had three different names and several nicknames. But Juliet was right — that which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet.

Rohit Talwani at his desk

Gamecock alumnus, physician reflects on how COVID-19 changed how he practices medicine

August 03, 2021, Chris Horn

COVID has offered the health care sector some valuable lessons, says University of South Carolina School of Medicine alumnus Rohit Talwani. A Baltimore-based physician and University of Maryland School of Medicine associate professor of infectious diseases, Dr. Talwani is one of 10 Gamecocks Carolinian magazine spoke to about how the pandemic has changed the way we work.

Hudsonian Godwit

Biologist searches for environmental tipping points in marathon migratory species

July 26, 2021, Chris Horn

As a population biologist at the University of South Carolina, Nate Senner studies migratory bird species whose feats of endurance make his own look almost puny by comparison. What interests him most is not just the extremes that different bird species can endure but the many environmental variables to which they must adapt — with the long-term survival of their species population hanging in the balance.

xiaoming li

Breakthrough Leader: Xiaoming Li

July 14, 2021, Chris Horn

If Xiaoming Li was a professional athlete instead of a public health professor, he would make the All-Star team every year. Since joining the university in 2015 as director of the South Carolina SmartState Center for Health Care Quality, Li has authored or co-authored 179 scholarly publications and instituted an interdisciplinary campuswide Junior Scholar program that has successfully trained 41 doctoral students from different disciplines.

Michelle Dhunjishah and William Hubbard at Children's Law Center

Children's Law Center moves into renovated facility that's ideal for training

June 29, 2021, Chris Horn

It’s been a long time coming, but the Children’s Law Center finally has a permanent home, complete with a mock court room and a mock crime scene apartment for forensic training purposes. Those two assets are vital to the center’s mission of providing training to more than 10,000 professionals in justice, law enforcement and child welfare in South Carolina.

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SmartSight project unleashes power of AI to assist blind, visually impaired

June 18, 2021, Chris Horn

Pooyan Jamshidi, an assistant professor of computer science and engineering, is a principal investigator on a three-year $500,000 NSF collaborative grant to develop the intelligence and computing capabilities for a smart device dubbed SmartSight. The platform will enable on-device artificial intelligence to improve real-time perception for blind and visually-impaired users.

Yi Wang

Breakthrough Star: Yi Wang

June 15, 2021, Chris Horn

Simulation and computing is a mainstay in engineering design, a mathematical modeling process that allows engineers to predict the behavior of a machine or system in real-world conditions. But if the datasets are huge and complex, modeling can take days or even weeks to sort out. That’s why Yi Wang is using a method called reduced-order models to speed things up.

Van Kornegay with drone

High-flying photography

June 09, 2021, Chris Horn

When Van Kornegay earned his pilot’s license last year, his feet never left the ground, but he paved a runway for students in the School of Journalism and Mass Communications. Kornegay’s FAA drone license opens the door for him to teach a new visual communications course in which students will learn to fly camera-equipped drones that have become a go-to tool in documentary making, news gathering, infrastructure inspection, real estate marketing and more.

damaged beach house

Climate change, coastlands and the most vulnerable who live there

June 03, 2021, Chris Horn

A rising tide might lift all boats, but not everyone fares the same with rising seas. Monica Barra has documented that fact extensively in her studies of coastal land loss among communities of color in the bayous of Louisiana. With a focus on the ways that residents, scientific knowledge and the coastal landscape intersect, the assistant professor of race and environment is bringing a similar research perspective to the South Carolina coastline.

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Remembering the Days: Heading east

May 20, 2021, Chris Horn

The University of South Carolina experienced enormous enrollment growth in the 1960s and began expanding its campus in several directions. Its move eastward into the University Hill neighborhood greatly expanded the campus footprint, but also stirred tensions with the residents when construction on the high-rise Capstone House began.

Jabari Bodrick, U101 Teacher of the Year

Forging student connections

April 22, 2021, Chris Horn

It’s a fact that students who complete University 101 at the University of South Carolina do better in their collegiate pursuits. Having Jabari Bodrick as your U101 instructor is icing on the cake. Just ask the students who nominated Bodrick for this year’s U101 Teacher of the Year award.

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Remembering the Days: Tales from the President's House, part 1

April 19, 2021, Chris Horn

The President's House on the historic Horseshoe has been home to every university president since 1952. Patricia Moore-Pastides, who lived in the house as university first lady for 11 years, talked with the now-grown children of those former presidents to find out what life was like for them during their years in the President's House.

Sydney Womack, graduating senior May 2021

Class of 2021: Sydney Womack

April 15, 2021, Chris Horn

Sydney Womack’s calendar has been booked nearly solid during her four years at South Carolina and little wonder — she majored in biomedical engineering, minored in mathematics, earned a performance certificate in the School of Music, conducted undergraduate research and co-authored a scholarly article and three poster presentations. She also attended football, basketball and baseball games whenever she could, held leadership positions in two engineering student societies and regularly volunteered to pitch STEM career opportunities to high school students.

Brianna Lewis, 2021 graduating senior

Class of 2021: Brianna Lewis

April 13, 2021, Chris Horn

Brianna Lewis was voted “most likely to become a brain surgeon” in the first grade, and the Simpsonville, S.C.-native will soon begin earning the “Dr.” portion of that prediction. She’s headed to medical school this fall after wrapping up four years in the Honors College and two bachelor’s degrees — one in biology and another in experimental psychology.

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Remembering the Days: Born a slave -- Matilda Pinckney's story

April 01, 2021, Chris Horn

In the long history of schoolteachers in South Carolina, Matilda Pinckney's story stands out. Born a slave on the historic Horseshoe at the University of South Carolina, Pinckney was later trained at a Normal School on the university campus and would go on to a 30-plus year career as an educator. 

Cantey Heath

A long ride draws to a close

March 25, 2021, Chris Horn

Cantey Heath’s 36-year career at the University of South Carolina began in alumni relations, pivoted to fundraising, then took another turn when he became special assistant and chief of staff to former university president Harris Pastides. Now, the university secretary and secretary of the Board of Trustees is headed for retirement.

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Remembering the Days: Books before buildings

March 22, 2021, Chris Horn

From its founding in the early 19th century, the University of South Carolina was keenly interested in building a library collection to properly educate its students. Since then, the library's holdings have become a treasure trove that includes rare books and special collections that attract scholars from around the world.

image from 19th century painting of Horseshoe

2 centuries of complex history

March 08, 2021, Chris Horn

In one of his first official acts as the University of South Carolina's 29th president, Bob Caslen authorized the Presidential Commission on University History. Since then, the commission has been researching building and place names on campus and considering ways to expand and disseminate the history of the institution.

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Remembering the Days: Seeing Stars, the university's 3 observatories

February 02, 2021, Chris Horn

Nearly 150 years before the original Star Trek TV series came to be, South Carolina College built its first observatory to boldly go where no one had — wait, it wasn't that dramatic! But that 1817 observatory made way for another campus observatory building in 1852 and still another in 1928. That last one, the Melton Memorial Observatory, is still going strong today, offering spectacular views of the night-time skies on clear Monday evenings.

Jimmy Story, ambassador to Venezuela

Honors College graduate on front lines of U.S.-Venezuelan foreign policy

January 26, 2021, Chris Horn

It’s not surprising that Antony Blinken, the newly installed U.S. Secretary of State, fielded questions about Venezuela in his first confirmation hearing. Fortunately for Blinken, the State Department already has a steady hand on the ground — Jimmy Story, a career diplomat and South Carolina Honors College graduate who was confirmed as ambassador to Venezuela this past November.

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Remembering the Days: Dress Codes and Curfews

November 23, 2020, Chris Horn

Dress codes and curfews persisted at the University of South Carolina until well into the 1960s, but in the waning years were mainly focused on female students. Kit Smith, a 1967 graduate, recalls the dire consequences of returning to campus 15 minutes late. 

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Remembering the Days: Pranking the Tiger

November 19, 2020, Chris Horn

The Carolina-Clemson football game of 1961 was a close game that ended with an exciting goal-line stand, but this story is about what took place before the game ever started — what’s been hailed as one of the best pranks ever pulled in the history of college football.

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COVID-19 and the retail sector

October 29, 2020, Chris Horn

Retail sales in the U.S. account for about one-half of personal consumer spending and nearly one-third 
of the country’s gross domestic product. But COVID-19 and its accompanying ripples — social distancing, 
lockdowns, layoffs and changes in consumer behavior — have unleashed turmoil in the retail sector. 
Jeff Campbell, an associate professor and chair of the retailing department in the College of Hospitality, 
Retail and Sport Management, offers his perspective on the current landscape in retailing and what 
lies ahead.

woman sneezing

UofSC scientists model how the COVID-19 virus might travel, settle in indoor environments

October 15, 2020, Chris Horn

In this age of COVID-19 concerns, what’s the safest indoor environment? One without humans, of course. In a practical world the answer lies partly in understanding how the virus moves and where it lands in indoor spaces because air ow and surfaces are important routes for transmission of COVID-19.

flappers from the 1920s

The Roaring '20s -- America and UofSC a century ago

October 12, 2020, Chris Horn

It’s often referred to as the Roaring ‘20s — the third decade of the 20th century that’s generally associated with prosperity, Prohibition, jazz music and flappers. It’s also the theme of this year’s virtual Homecoming at the University of South Carolina, which takes place Oct. 16-18. In the spirit of that celebration, here’s a look back at what life was like in America and at the university a century ago.

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Remembering the Days: The Roaring '20s

September 29, 2020, Chris Horn

Remembering the Days podcast Episode 14: What was it like in America and on the Carolina campus a hundred years ago during the Roaring '20s? Contrary to popular belief, not everyone was having a roaring good time, but that memorable decade brought lasting change to the university and the nation. 

detail of Richard Greener statue

Presidential Commission re-examines university's complex history

September 19, 2020, Chris Horn

When President Bob Caslen established the Presidential Commission on University History last year, he tasked it with leading a research effort “into the complex history of the university.” That task is every bit as challenging as one might expect for an institution whose nearly 220-year history was shaped first by the antebellum South, the Civil War and decades of state-sponsored racial segregation.

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Podcast Episode 13: 100 years of the Mighty Sound

September 18, 2020, Chris Horn

The Mighty Sound of the Southeast, the University of South Carolina's Marching Band, celebrates its 100th anniversary this fall, and what a century it's been! Find out what the band has in common with Elvis Presley and how you can enjoy a virtual concert on Facebook. 

Breakthrough Leader: Rob Ployhart

Breakthrough Leader: Rob Ployhart

July 13, 2020, Chris Horn

Ask any Fortune 500 company what it takes to get ahead in today’s marketplace, and you’ll probably hear something about workforce training and recruitment — the fundamentals of human resources. Rob Ployhart has made it his business to understand exactly how those factors translate into competitive advantage, and in the process he’s become one of the country’s most-cited scholars on the topic.

1960s civil rights protestor carries signs denouncing segregation

Carving a path toward justice: Part 3

June 05, 2020, Chris Horn

Bobby Donaldson is an associate professor of history and African American Studies and director of the Center for Civil Rights History and Research at the University of South Carolina. In a three-part question-and-answer series, Donaldson presents both his scholarly insights and his personal perspective as they relate to protests over the death of George Floyd.

Bobby Donaldson

Carving a path toward justice: Part 2

June 05, 2020, Chris Horn

Bobby Donaldson is an associate professor of history and African American Studies and director of the Center for Civil Rights History and Research at the University of South Carolina. In a three-part question-and-answer series, Donaldson presents both his scholarly insights and his personal perspective as they relate to protests over the death of George Floyd.

Martin Luther King speaks in Charleston in 1967

Carving a path toward justice: Part 1

June 05, 2020, Chris Horn

Bobby Donaldson is an associate professor of history and African American Studies and director of the Center for Civil Rights History and Research at the University of South Carolina. In a three-part question-and-answer series, Donaldson presents both his scholarly insights and his personal perspective as they relate to protests over the death of George Floyd.

Paige Fallon

The study abroad experience that, ultimately, helped save a life

May 28, 2020, Chris Horn

This past spring semester, Paige Fallon began a study abroad experience in Europe, then got sick with COVID-19 and ended up in quarantine back home in Ohio. But the rising senior made the most of her experience after recovering from the virus that has killed some 350,000 worldwide — she helped save a life.

Rebekah Cloninger

Class of 2020: Senior takes a flying leap toward career serving others

May 11, 2020, Chris Horn

Rebekah Cloninger has a lot to tell her future children and grandchildren about her time at the University of South Carolina. Like the night she met A’ja Wilson, the Most Outstanding Player from the 2017 championship team, and got her jersey signed by the former UofSC forward who now plays for the Las Vegas Aces.

breakthrough leader dawn wilson-king

Breakthrough Leader: Dawn Wilson-King

April 13, 2020, Chris Horn

Dawn Wilson-King has devoted her career to helping people pursue active and healthy lifestyles, and what a career it’s been. Since 2001, the psychology professor has collaborated on more than 30 grant-funded projects that brought some $40 million in grant funding to the University of South Carolina and she served as president of two prominent national organizations.

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Podcast Episode 5: Looking for Jack

March 31, 2020, Chris Horn

The history of enslaved people at South Carolina College — the precursor of today's University of South Carolina — is a difficult one to tell. But research has brought to light the names of many of those individuals, and the university is acknowledging the vital role they played in the college's early days. Here's the story of one of those enslaved workers — a man named Jack.

artwork depicting historic admissions requirements

Podcast Episode 4: Getting in, admission standards then and now

March 17, 2020, Chris Horn

How difficult was it to get admitted to the University of South Carolina in 1897? At that time, regrettably, only white students were admitted. Students also had to know grammar, geography, algebra, history — and Latin and Greek! Admission standards at the university have varied in the past two centuries. The bar for admission is a lot different than it was in 1897, but it guarantees that those who get in are ready to succeed.

newspaper clippings showing the historical images of the wall being built around the horseshoe

Podcast Episode 2: The Great Wall of Carolina

February 18, 2020, Chris Horn

It's nearly seven feet tall, 3,000 feet long and is made of 160,000 bricks. And it's older than half of the buildings on the University of South Carolina's historic Horseshoe. It's the campus wall, a structure that never succeeded in its original purpose — keeping mischievous 19th century students on campus. But during one tumultuous night in 1865, the wall very likely saved the campus from a fire that consumed one-third of the surrounding city.